très beau

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my art, photography, and other things

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Lookporn:

Red Moon, Lunar Eclipse on México, April 14th 15th 2014.

Lookporn:

Red Moon, Lunar Eclipse on México, April 14th 15th 2014.

(Source: bryanchvzz, via unprecedenteddreams)

— 1 day ago with 19077 notes

homohustle:

glowcloud:

whythatsbullshit:

misandry-mermaid:

protego-et-servio:

my-unashamedly-antiabortion-blog:

Survivors of the Abortion Holocaust

"We are going to lay down to join our dead brothers and sisters from the womb, rather than donate this time and effort into helping the sentient and suffering."

Again, none of you were at immediate risk to be aborted. You’re not survivors.

Also, don’t you fucking dare appropriate the word ‘holocaust’ for your own selfish, ignorant “activism” you disgusting, anti-Semitic, misogynistic garbagebags.

I have a real problem with people appropriating the words “holocaust”, “slavery”, “genocide”, things like that. It’s just so disrespectful to actual survivors. 

Also, lol, nice protest. I’m sure pregnant women everywhere are seeing this and thinking “Y’know what, these morons lying down on the ground in red sheets…maybe I should listen to them”

hopefully u can all just lay there and never get up again

Open the door

Get on the floor

Everybody join the scumbag corps

(via nanofaun)

— 2 days ago with 9771 notes

earthnation:

that thin ass chocolate bowl would never be able to withstand the pressure of my spoon trying to slice ice cream

also, smallest package of ice cream ever

(Source: depression-and-movies, via perpetuating-pez)

— 2 days ago with 538607 notes

katsplanet:

whenever people say they dont like cats because they dont happily greet you at the door i give them the stinkiest eye

this is like my kitty! she also runs up to my car if she is outside when i come home.

(Source: stevenstelfox, via nanofaun)

— 2 days ago with 81222 notes

officialfrenchtoast:

looking at your notes after an exam

image

i fucked up

(via lifeinflames)

— 2 days ago with 14338 notes
"If all we’re doing to address toxic masculinity is to expand the masculine box, we’re not fixing anything.
The problem with the male “box” getting smaller as the gender roles for women expand isn’t feminism, it isn’t women, it isn’t “female privilege”, it’s masculinity, male privilege and the idea that being a man MUST BE BETTER than being a woman, that MAN STUFF CANNOT TOUCH WOMAN STUFF, that being a woman is bad, that being called a girl is the WORST THING EVER, that being told you throw like a girl will DESTROY YOU.
That’s the problem.
And the solution isn’t to push women back, and take all their stuff, and put up a flag saying I PROCLAIM THIS LAND IN THE NAME OF MANHOOD, it’s for “manhood” to get the fuck over itself, and understand there’s nothing wrong with sharing qualities, interests, traits, and identity with girls and women."

Ami Angelwings on toxic idea of masculinity in our culture.

Just dug up this article and thought I’d share the most crucial part of it. Ami masterfully examines how hurtful are patriarchal views on gender.

(via ozziescribbler)

(via tellwiddit)

— 3 days ago with 1235 notes

ohaiena:

bogleech:

gameraboy:

"A Sticky Situation" (1960) by Carl Barks

I like how advertising is literally still exactly as sexist as they’re joking about in this comic from 54 years ago.

*ptsd flashback to that diet dr pepper campaign*

(via finickyphoenix)

— 3 days ago with 112205 notes
thebicker:

america-wakiewakie:

satanic-capitalist:
Eight Headlines the Mainstream Media Doesn’t Have the Courage to Print | Nation Of Change 
By Paul Buchheit

The following are all relevant, fact-based issues, the “hard news” stories that the media has a responsibility to report. But the business-oriented press generally avoids them.
1. U.S. Wealth Is Up $34 Trillion Since The Recession. 93 Percent Of You Got Almost None Of It.
That’s an average of $100,000 for every American. But the people who already own most of the stocks took almost all of it. For them, the average gain was well over a million dollars — tax-free as long as they don’t cash it in. Details available here.
2. Eight Rich Americans Made More Than 3.6 Million Minimum Wage Workers
A recent report stated that no full-time minimum wage worker in the U.S. can afford a one-bedroom or two-bedroom rental at fair market rent. There are 3.6 million such workers, and their total (combined) 2013 earnings is less than the 2013 stock market gains of just eight Americans, all of whom take more than their share from society: the four Waltons, the two Kochs, Bill Gates, and Warren Buffett.
3. News Sources Speak For The 5 Percent
It would be refreshing to read an honest editorial: “We dearly value the 5 to 7 percent of our readers who make a lot of money and believe that their growing riches are helping everyone else.”
Instead, the business media seems unable to differentiate between the top 5 percent and the rest of society. The Wall Street Journal exclaimed, “Middle-class Americans have more buying power than ever before,” and then went on to sputter: “What recession? … The economy has bounced back from recession, unemployment has declined.”
The Chicago Tribune may be even further out of touch with its less privileged readers, asking them: “What’s so terrible about the infusion of so much money into the presidential campaign?”
4. TV News Is Dumbed Down For American Viewers
A 2009 survey by the European Journal of Communication compared the U.S. to Denmark, Finland, and the UK in the awareness and reporting of domestic vs. international news, and of ‘hard’ news (politics, public administration, the economy, science, technology) vs. ‘soft’ news (celebrities, human interest, sport and entertainment). The results:
— Americans [are] especially uninformed about international public affairs.
— American respondents also underperformed in relation to domestic-related hard news stories.
— American television reports much less international news than Finnish, Danish and British television;
— American television network newscasts also report much less hard news than Finnish and Danish television.
Surprisingly, the report states that “our sample of American newspapers was more oriented towards hard news than their counterparts in the European countries.” Too bad Americans are reading less newspapers.
5. There Is No Self-Made Man
The hype about the “self-made man” is fantasy. In the early 1970s, we privileged white males were spirited out of college to waiting jobs in management and finance, technology was inventing new ways for us to make money, tax rates were about to tumble, and visions of bonuses and capital gains danced in our heads.
While we were in school the Defense Department had been preparing the Internet for Microsoft and Apple, the National Science Foundation was funding the Digital Library Initiative research that would be adopted as the Google model, and the National Institute of Health was doing the early laboratory testing for companies like Merck and Pfizer. Government research labs and public universities trained thousands of chemists, physicists, chip designers, programmers, engineers, production line workers, market analysts, testers, troubleshooters, etc., etc.
All we created on our own was a disdainful attitude, like that of Steve Jobs: “We have always been shameless about stealing great ideas.”
6. Funding Plummets For Schools And Pensions As Corporations Stop Paying Taxes
Three separate studies have shown that corporations pay less than half of their required state taxes, which are the main source of K-12 educational funding and a significant part of pension funding. Most recently, the report ”The Disappearing Corporate Tax Base” found that the percentage of corporate profits paid as state income taxes has dropped from 7 percent in 1980 to about 3 percent today.
7. Companies Based In The U.S. Pay Most Of Their Taxes Overseas
Citigroup had 42 percent of its 2011-13 revenue in North America (almost all U.S.) and made $32 billion in profits, but received a U.S. current income tax benefit all three years.
Pfizer had 40 percent of its 2011-13 revenues and nearly half of its physical assets in the U.S., but declared almost $10 billion in U.S. losses to go along with nearly $50 billion in foreign profits.
In 2013 Exxon had about 43 percent of management, 36 percent of sales, 40 percent of long-lived assets, and 70-90 percent of its productive oil and gas wells in the U.S., yet only paid about 2 percent of its total income in U.S. income taxes, and most of that was something called a “theoretical” tax.
8. Restaurant Servers Have Gone Without A Raise For 30 Years
An evaluation by Michelle Chen showed that the minimum wage for tipped workers has been approximately $2 an hour since the 1980s. She also notes that about 40 percent of these workers are people of color, and about two-thirds are women.


This made me so angry I’m shaking. I disagree with the assertion that these issues haven’t gotten any media coverage - I’ve certainly heard about them before. They definitely haven’t gotten the coverage they deserve, and outlets like the Wall Street Journal are unabashed corporate shills, but there are definitely places out there doing great journalism.
(Note: I made some capitalization and grammar changes to the original post.)

thebicker:

america-wakiewakie:

satanic-capitalist:

Eight Headlines the Mainstream Media Doesn’t Have the Courage to Print | Nation Of Change 

By Paul Buchheit

The following are all relevant, fact-based issues, the “hard news” stories that the media has a responsibility to report. But the business-oriented press generally avoids them.

1. U.S. Wealth Is Up $34 Trillion Since The Recession. 93 Percent Of You Got Almost None Of It.

That’s an average of $100,000 for every American. But the people who already own most of the stocks took almost all of it. For them, the average gain was well over a million dollars — tax-free as long as they don’t cash it in. Details available here.

2. Eight Rich Americans Made More Than 3.6 Million Minimum Wage Workers

A recent report stated that no full-time minimum wage worker in the U.S. can afford a one-bedroom or two-bedroom rental at fair market rent. There are 3.6 million such workers, and their total (combined) 2013 earnings is less than the 2013 stock market gains of just eight Americans, all of whom take more than their share from society: the four Waltons, the two Kochs, Bill Gates, and Warren Buffett.

3. News Sources Speak For The 5 Percent

It would be refreshing to read an honest editorial: “We dearly value the 5 to 7 percent of our readers who make a lot of money and believe that their growing riches are helping everyone else.”

Instead, the business media seems unable to differentiate between the top 5 percent and the rest of society. The Wall Street Journal exclaimed, “Middle-class Americans have more buying power than ever before,” and then went on to sputter: “What recession? … The economy has bounced back from recession, unemployment has declined.”

The Chicago Tribune may be even further out of touch with its less privileged readers, asking them: “What’s so terrible about the infusion of so much money into the presidential campaign?”

4. TV News Is Dumbed Down For American Viewers

A 2009 survey by the European Journal of Communication compared the U.S. to Denmark, Finland, and the UK in the awareness and reporting of domestic vs. international news, and of ‘hard’ news (politics, public administration, the economy, science, technology) vs. ‘soft’ news (celebrities, human interest, sport and entertainment). The results:

— Americans [are] especially uninformed about international public affairs.

— American respondents also underperformed in relation to domestic-related hard news stories.

— American television reports much less international news than Finnish, Danish and British television;

— American television network newscasts also report much less hard news than Finnish and Danish television.

Surprisingly, the report states that “our sample of American newspapers was more oriented towards hard news than their counterparts in the European countries.” Too bad Americans are reading less newspapers.

5. There Is No Self-Made Man

The hype about the “self-made man” is fantasy. In the early 1970s, we privileged white males were spirited out of college to waiting jobs in management and finance, technology was inventing new ways for us to make money, tax rates were about to tumble, and visions of bonuses and capital gains danced in our heads.

While we were in school the Defense Department had been preparing the Internet for Microsoft and Apple, the National Science Foundation was funding the Digital Library Initiative research that would be adopted as the Google model, and the National Institute of Health was doing the early laboratory testing for companies like Merck and Pfizer. Government research labs and public universities trained thousands of chemists, physicists, chip designers, programmers, engineers, production line workers, market analysts, testers, troubleshooters, etc., etc.

All we created on our own was a disdainful attitude, like that of Steve Jobs: “We have always been shameless about stealing great ideas.”

6. Funding Plummets For Schools And Pensions As Corporations Stop Paying Taxes

Three separate studies have shown that corporations pay less than half of their required state taxes, which are the main source of K-12 educational funding and a significant part of pension funding. Most recently, the report ”The Disappearing Corporate Tax Base” found that the percentage of corporate profits paid as state income taxes has dropped from 7 percent in 1980 to about 3 percent today.

7. Companies Based In The U.S. Pay Most Of Their Taxes Overseas

Citigroup had 42 percent of its 2011-13 revenue in North America (almost all U.S.) and made $32 billion in profits, but received a U.S. current income tax benefit all three years.

Pfizer had 40 percent of its 2011-13 revenues and nearly half of its physical assets in the U.S., but declared almost $10 billion in U.S. losses to go along with nearly $50 billion in foreign profits.

In 2013 Exxon had about 43 percent of management, 36 percent of sales, 40 percent of long-lived assets, and 70-90 percent of its productive oil and gas wells in the U.S., yet only paid about 2 percent of its total income in U.S. income taxes, and most of that was something called a “theoretical” tax.

8. Restaurant Servers Have Gone Without A Raise For 30 Years

An evaluation by Michelle Chen showed that the minimum wage for tipped workers has been approximately $2 an hour since the 1980s. She also notes that about 40 percent of these workers are people of color, and about two-thirds are women.

This made me so angry I’m shaking. I disagree with the assertion that these issues haven’t gotten any media coverage - I’ve certainly heard about them before. They definitely haven’t gotten the coverage they deserve, and outlets like the Wall Street Journal are unabashed corporate shills, but there are definitely places out there doing great journalism.

(Note: I made some capitalization and grammar changes to the original post.)

(via sans-nuage)

— 3 days ago with 1014 notes

vinegod:

WHEN YOU PULL OUT MINTS IN PUBLIC by TonyBakercomedy

hahahahhaham the dog

(via lifeinflames)

— 3 days ago with 40787 notes

nubianbrothaz:

ourblackproject:

The Black body, more so of women, have stood on the opposite side of the narrow Eurocentric standards of beauty. Black hairstyles have defiantly rebelled against and even when straightened added creative magic of Blackness and Boldness. 

Black hair, whether relaxed or natural, locked or shaven is beautiful. Black women are beautiful. 

nubianbrothaz.tumblr.com

(via black-culture)

— 4 days ago with 61965 notes